Recently, I became tired of writing the same old tedious code for every single RecyclerView and Adpater class I used, that all did the same thing, so I extrapolated all of it into a personal library.

The RecyclerViewUtils library helps make everyone’s life a little easier with a CoreViewHolder and CoreAdapter class, described below.

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Android has a built in SearchView component but it doesn’t feel much like Material Design. This has even been asked on StackOverflow because developers are having trouble recreating the same MaterialSearchView that appears in many of Google’s applications. However, thanks to one of my good friends Maurício, you can now implement this great component in your own projects!

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As a form of ultimate procrastination this weekend, I decided to spend the last two days developing a RichTextView library.

This weekend I built the RichTextView (the naming convention comes from the RichTextBox C# class) which allows the user to format different parts ofa. TextView in different ways. For example, if I wanted to display a string but only bold a portion of it, I could achieve that with this class.

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User interface for Android Wear have all the same components as a phone’s UI, they just appear a little differently. In this post we’re going to talk about Cards. You’ve most likely seen these in the Google now app, among other Material Design apps. Cards are great because they are a component that is able to provide a consistent look across multiple platforms.

We will consider this post as a deeper dive into an existing tutorial in the Android docs, but as that one states the Cards discussed here are not the same as the Cards that appear as notifications on Android Wear. See the link to better understand this distinction. Let’s go over some of the relevant classes, and we’ll discuss their differences and how to implement them.

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Rising in popularity after the latest Google I/O, Android Wear is a game changer for mobile development. Wearable technology has brought benefits from a quicker access to information to a more accurate monitoring of our physical health. Developing for this platform allows you to tap into those features that are not as readily available on mobile handhelds as well as offer a more immersive experience of your product by making it available on wearable devices.

As always, the documentation will offer the most thorough insight into what is available, but I’d like to discuss how the UI development differs and how you can get started.

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